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Our Mission: To Improve Your Crops in a Safe and Sustainable Way

Not Treating but Preventing Problems

Stimulates the Plants Immune System

Helps the Plants Defend Themselves Through a Natural Symbiosis

A green alternative to the use of chemical pesticides

dual-front

The natural occurrence in crop plants of the beneficial symbiotic fungus Beauveria bassiana has been significantly depressed by modern farm practices. Our proprietary products help to put it back.

This natural symbiotic partnership elevates the plant’s natural ability to resist pathogens and seasonal stressors.

A combination of our superior proprietary fungal strain (called DBX HF23) and superior proprietary manufacturing processes makes our products the best for your crops.

 

 

New SBb2.5 label cropped-front-page

Our proprietary seed inoculant products, SPE-120 and SBb2.5, contain unique strains of Beauveria bassiana.

The products are applied as a one-and-done seed inoculant before planting. No subsequent treatments are required. SPE-120 is OMRI listed for organic use.

image001 (1)

The beneficial interactions can improve:

  • Yield,
  • Quality
  • Resistance to Fungal Diseases
  • Resilience to Flooding and Drought
  • Toxin Levels.

What are SPE-120 and SBb 2.5?

SPE-120 and SBb 2.5 are similar products that contain the spores of the beneficial symbiotic fungus Beauveria bassiana. The main difference between the two products is that SPE-120 is OMRI listed for organic use. Both products are available in both liquid and dry forms and are used to treat plants to establish a beneficial symbiosis. For best results, the plants should be treated so that the fungus can establish itself in the plant as the first roots form. This typically means treating the seeds or watering the product in furrow after the seeds are sown. An early establishment of the beneficial symbiosis is more likely to result in a larger root system and larger, more biochemically active, plants. Increases in yield, quality, resistance to diseases (especially fungal diseases), resilience to flooding and drought, and reduced toxin levels are commonly seen in the SPE-120 and SBb 2.5-treated plants.

What is Beauveria bassiana?

Beauveria bassiana is a fungus that grows naturally in soils throughout the world, although modern farming practices have greatly reduced the occurrence of this beneficial organism. It can form a symbiotic relationship with plants and has an extremely broad host spectrum. Beauveria bassiana can control and even eliminate pathogens when inoculated into different crops. It achieves these benefits in several distinct ways, including by initiating Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) a process that turns on the host plants defenses to a low level. This priming of the plant’s defenses leads to greater resistance to a broad range of pathogens and pests. The symbiosis can also eliminate pathogens by antibiosis (the beneficial fungus secretes metabolites and proteins that act against pathogens), mycoparasitism (where the Beauveria parasitizes invading fungi), or simple competition (the Beauveria hyphae colonize the entire plant and leave no room for the growth of pathogens). The plant tissues can exchange carbon and nitrogen with Beauveria bassiana and this has been shown to promote plant growth and increase yields under field conditions. The broad host range and many beneficial effects of Beauveria bassiana symbiosis on pests, pathogens, growth, yields, drought responses, toxin levels, biochemical levels has led to Beauveria bassiana being called “The Swiss Army Knife of Biological Control Agents.”

Who was Agostino Bassi?

Agostino Bassi (25 September 1773 – 8 February 1856), was an Italian entomologist who discovered that numerous diseases are caused by microorganisms. His work preceded that of Louis Pasteur, who had a portrait of Bassi in his office. Bassi announced his discoveries in 1835 and thus, he preceded both Pasteur and Robert Koch in formulating the germ theory of disease. The fungus that he was studying would later be called Beauveria bassiana in his honor, and Beauveria would become the first Biological Control Agent (Biological) in the world.

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A green alternative to the use of chemical pesticides and herbicides

dual-front

The natural occurrence in crop plants of the beneficial symbiotic fungus Beauveria bassiana has been significantly depressed by modern farm practices. Our proprietary products help to put it back.

This natural symbiotic partnership elevates the plant’s natural ability to resist pathogens and seasonal stressors.

New SBb2.5 label cropped-front-page

Our proprietary seed inoculant products, SPE-120 and SBb2.5, contain unique strains of Beauveria bassiana.

The products are applied as a one-and-done seed inoculant before planting. No subsequent treatments are required. SPE-120 is OMRI listed for organic use.

image001 (1)

The beneficial interactions can improve:

  • Yield
  • Quality
  • Resistance to Fungal Diseases
  • Resilience to Flooding and Drought
  • Toxin Levels.

The symbiosis produced by our products have been shown to benefit essentially all plants including:

  • Crop plants grown in large outdoor acreages
  • High value produce grown in greenhouses
  • Very high value plants grown in hydroponics
  • House plants
  • Mother plants
  • Turf grass

What are SPE-120 and SBb 2.5?

SPE-120 and SBb 2.5 are similar products that contain the spores of the beneficial symbiotic fungus Beauveria bassiana. The main difference between the two products is that SPE-120 is OMRI listed for organic use. Both products are available in both liquid and dry forms and are used to treat plants to establish a beneficial symbiosis. For best results, the plants should be treated so that the fungus can establish itself in the plant as the first roots form. This typically means treating the seeds or watering the product in furrow after the seeds are sown. An early establishment of the beneficial symbiosis is more likely to result in a larger root system and larger, more biochemically active, plants. Increases in yield, quality, resistance to diseases (especially fungal diseases), resilience to flooding and drought, and reduced toxin levels are commonly seen in the SPE-120 and SBb 2.5-treated plants.

What is Beauveria bassiana?

Beauveria bassiana is a fungus that grows naturally in soils throughout the world, although modern farming practices have greatly reduced the occurrence of this beneficial organism. It can form a symbiotic relationship with plants and has an extremely broad host spectrum. Beauveria bassiana can control and even eliminate pathogens when inoculated into different crops. It achieves these benefits in several distinct ways, including by initiating Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) a process that turns on the host plants defenses to a low level. This priming of the plant’s defenses leads to greater resistance to a broad range of pathogens and pests. The symbiosis can also eliminate pathogens by antibiosis (the beneficial fungus secretes metabolites and proteins that act against pathogens), mycoparasitism (where the Beauveria parasitizes invading fungi), or simple competition (the Beauveria hyphae colonize the entire plant and leave no room for the growth of pathogens). The plant tissues can exchange carbon and nitrogen with Beauveria bassiana and this has been shown to promote plant growth and increase yields under field conditions. The broad host range and many beneficial effects of Beauveria bassiana symbiosis on pests, pathogens, growth, yields, drought responses, toxin levels, biochemical levels has led to Beauveria bassiana being called “The Swiss Army Knife of Biological Control Agents.”

Who was Agostino Bassi?

Agostino Bassi (25 September 1773 – 8 February 1856), was an Italian entomologist who discovered that numerous diseases are caused by microorganisms. His work preceded that of Louis Pasteur, who had a portrait of Bassi in his office. Bassi announced his discoveries in 1835 and thus, he preceded both Pasteur and Robert Koch in formulating the germ theory of disease. The fungus that he was studying would later be called Beauveria bassiana in his honor, and Beauveria would become the first Biological Control Agent (Biological) in the world.

Latest News